Pancake Recipe Stood the Test of Time

By Evans, Judith | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), May 29, 1995 | Go to article overview

Pancake Recipe Stood the Test of Time


Evans, Judith, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


SOME YEARS, it was titled "For the Bride," other years, "To the Bride." The page the recipe appeared on varied as well. But despite those inconsistencies, Mary Lou Kemper of St. Louis can once again make the pancake recipe she remembers.

In 1956, the year she got married, Stix, Baer and Fuller department stores gave every bride who registered for gifts a copy of a cookbook. "In moving, it got lost," she wrote. "I miss it, mostly for the pancake recipe on page 166. We have tried other recipes and haven't found one we like as well."

Macki Miller of St. Louis sent in her recipe, from the 1958 edition. "It was probably the first cookbook I received as a bride," Miller wrote. "I had almost forgotten it through the years. Surely brought back happy memories as well as some chuckles about my cooking way back then."

Pat Hezel of St. Louis also sent in a recipe, as did Margaret Munsell, Bellefontaine Neighbors; Judith Cooney, Glendale; and Joan Kaibel, St. Charles.

PANCAKES

1 cup sifted all-purpose flour

1 tablespoon baking powder

2 tablespoons granulated sugar

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 egg

1 cup milk (see note)

2 tablespoons vegetable oil or melted fat

Margarine, syrup or cinnamon sugar, for topping

Sift together flour, baking powder, sugar and salt.

Beat egg; stir in milk and oil. Add egg mixture to dry mixture; beat until smooth. Drop by tablespoons onto hot ungreased griddle. Cook until bubbles appear over surface, then flip and cook other side. Top with margarine, syrup or cinnamon sugar.

Yield: 10 pancakes.

Note: Adjust the amount of milk to suit your taste for thick or thin pancakes.

This recipe is from Blue Diamond walnuts. "It was `oh so good,' " wrote Fern Kuntzman of St. Louis when she requested it.

We got recipes from Macki Miller, St. Louis; Doris O'Brien, Chesterfield; Fran Hanson, Valley Park; and Mary Durham, Omaha, Neb.

DIAMOND WALNUT

RASPBERRY BROWNIES

3 (1-ounce) squares unsweetened chocolate

1/2 cup solid vegetable shortening

3 eggs

1 1/2 cups granulated sugar

1 1/2 teaspoons vanilla

1/4 teaspoon salt

1 cup all-purpose flour

1 1/2 cups chopped walnuts

1/3 cup raspberry jam

Velvet chocolate glaze (see recipe)

Chocolate dipped walnuts, for garnish; optional

Melt chocolate with shortening over warm water; let cool slightly. …

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