Breakfast on Broadway the Oyster Bar Serves Up Jazz and Brunch in Revamped Patio

By Francesca Get Out Correspondent | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), June 15, 1995 | Go to article overview

Breakfast on Broadway the Oyster Bar Serves Up Jazz and Brunch in Revamped Patio


Francesca Get Out Correspondent, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


The boyfriend, looking for a way to postpone yard work, suggested we check out the jazz brunch at the Broadway Oyster Bar on a recent Sunday.

We arrived shortly before noon and had our choice of tables on the patio. We opted for one in the sun, though several of the tables are arranged so that one person can sit in the sun and another can have shade.

By the way, the patio has been totally overhauled. No need any longer to stick a matchbook under a table leg to keep the table from wobbling. The new design also includes an outer walkway to allow more people to see better when they come to hear music.

Our waiter took our drink order, set down menus and explained that neither the seafood quiche nor the vegetable quiche would be ready for an hour. This was unfortunate because of the 11 brunch entrees on the menu less than half seem to qualify as breakfast fare. Red beans and rice and jambalaya seem a bit too heavy as the first thing on Sunday.

We ordered bloody Marys and mulled over the possibilities. I decided on stuffed French toast, while the boyfriend ordered a ham-and-egg grinder. Then we turned our attention toward the stage, where Brian Casserly, the trumpeter with the Soulard Blues Band, and guitarist Randy Bahr were playing some light, extremely listenable jazz and blues tunes.

By this time, the place had filled up and everyone seemed to be enjoying the music and the gorgeous weather.

Our entrees arrived in the Oyster Bar's trademark stainless bowls. It took only one bite for me to know I had picked a winner. The French toast was stuffed with mild cheddar and mozzarella, then dipped in egg batter, grilled and topped with drizzles of honey and butter. Watching those calories, I had asked the waiter to hold the powdered sugar. …

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