Species Act: Many Say It's Endangered but Benign Landowner Conflicts Called Mostly Myth: Political Fights, Real

By Tom Uhlenbrock Of the Post-Dispatch | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), July 15, 1995 | Go to article overview

Species Act: Many Say It's Endangered but Benign Landowner Conflicts Called Mostly Myth: Political Fights, Real


Tom Uhlenbrock Of the Post-Dispatch, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


MEMBERS OF CONGRESS are zeroing in on the Endangered Species Act as if it were a troublesome varmint. But people who work with the act every day say it has caused few problems with landowners.

Politics, not endangered animals vs. property rights, is the real problem, they say.

"Most of these potential conflicts exist on the phone or on paper," says Dennis Figg, the endangered species coordinator for the Missouri Department of Conservation.

"I have personally investigated the cases that have made the most headlines nationally and found they are all largely misinformation and hype."

Figg often works with landowners to protect endangered plants like the Missouri bladderpod or animals like endangered Indiana and gray bats. Cooperation - not confrontation - is the norm, he said. Figg is on a national committee examining the conflicts blamed on the act. The committee will make recommendations to Congress on it.

He sent out questionnaires to officials in all 50 states, asking for examples of conflicts in their areas. He found most had the same experience as Missouri. Typical, he said, is the response from Texas. A state biologist there said she had been met at gunpoint when she approached a rancher with an endangered plant on his land. They talked, worked out a conservation plan, and are now friendly, if not friends.

The majority of conflicts end the same way, with the landowner and conservation agent agreeing on what's best for the rare plant or animal, Figg said.

Figures from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, which administers the act, confirm Figg's claim. The service says it reviewed 2,719 cases involving a landowner and an endangered species between 1988 and 1992 and found that 98 percent of the cases resulted in amicable agreement with the service. "People are scared by what they think the government will do or can do," said Figg. "The solution to most of these problems wasn't anything more than communicating." Bats - Nature's Insecticides

A crescent moon moved into place over the Osage River near Saint Elizabeth in central Missouri recently as the first dark streaks flew out of a cave high on a limestone bluff.

The twilight sky soon filled with thousands of bats. Four biologists below watched silently, listening to the whirring sound of the bats on their feeding run.

"Wonder if they'll take a lightning bug?" one spectator pondered as an insect blinked amid the black blurs. Thwack! The light went out.

The state acquired the property years ago, to protect the site. Gray bats, a federally endangered species, use the cave to raise young.

Below the cave, voices could be heard over the river as a motorboat headed in for the night. Its passengers did not know the bat colony had made their cruise more enjoyable. A hungry bat eats up to 600 mosquitoes an hour. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Species Act: Many Say It's Endangered but Benign Landowner Conflicts Called Mostly Myth: Political Fights, Real
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.