Want a Good Performance Review? Push for It

By Sherwood Ross 1995, Reuters News Service | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), July 31, 1995 | Go to article overview

Want a Good Performance Review? Push for It


Sherwood Ross 1995, Reuters News Service, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


As corporate managers try to do more with fewer workers, they are attaching increasing weight to the employee performance review.

"They are looking for people who are doing well and have the potential for doing better," said Craig Schneier of Pennington, N.J., a management consultant and author. "They are setting the bar higher for performance."

The best way to impress managers, said Schneier, is to "develop some clear expectations between you and your boss" at the start of the calendar or business year.

If you don't, "on Dec. 15, the boss might say, `I guess you didn't meet my expectations, Harry, so no raise.' "

Thinking ahead is the only way to deal with the tougher job climate in which even annual pay hikes are becoming a thing of the past.

Businesses are scrutinizing pay hikes as "part of a broader effort to streamline and maintain peak efficiency and profitability regardless of economic conditions," said Susan Rowland, a principal at management consultants Towers Perrin.

According to her firm's new study of 1,383 companies, merit pay raises are at a six-year low, typically just above the 3 percent projected inflation rate for the year.

To be among the lucky group that earns a merit raise, "You need to know how your boss defines `good' and what a stellar job is," Schneier said. Otherwise, "you may think you're doing great but the boss thinks you're not focusing on it."

Should your boss not come to you as time goes by, "be proactive, go in with a draft list of priorities and goals and say, `Here's how I see '95 shaping up," Schneier said. "Good bosses will hear you out and the best will take the initiative to set the priorities."

Periodically, check back with the boss to ask, "How do you think I did on that presentation? …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Want a Good Performance Review? Push for It
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.