Constitutional Amendments, Cont

By Victor T. Le Vine | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), August 1, 1995 | Go to article overview

Constitutional Amendments, Cont


Victor T. Le Vine, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


It's that time again. Whenever Republicans are in the ascendancy the nation is presented with a variety of proposed constitutional amendments. This season, they seek to mandate a balanced budget, impose term limits on Congress, champion school prayer and ban abortions and flag-burning. The same spirit that moves them to lift the oppressive burden of intrusive Big Government from the backs of a long-suffering citizenry also persuades them that same government must truncate political careers, enforce official worship in school, sanctify flags, superintend wombs and stop all spending except for corporate welfare and the military.

I can only applaud such civic-minded determination to improve our quality of life, and in that same spirit, offer some constitutional amendments of my own, all also designed to better our collective lot:

The Truth in Politics Amendment. This would forbid all expressions of hypocrisy and willful lying by elected officials. Certified liars and hypocrites would be subject to a short period of intense public odium and banned from holding public office for life. This really revolutionary idea should have been part of the Contract With America, but wasn't.

The Daddy Warbucks Amendment. On the assumption that those with inherited wealth are less likely to steal from the public purse, this would ban candidacies for major political offices - state and national - for all save second- or third-generation millionaires. It would also ban the candidacy of any millionaire who became wealthy from government contracts (The Perot Clause).

The National Political Pollution and Noise Suppression Amendment. The British have the right idea: They limit national election campaigns to four weeks. My amendment is more generous in light of the family entertainment values attending such events; it would limit presidential campaigns to three months prior to the November elections, and two months for any congressional campaign, with any state reserving the right to ban all presidential campaigning outright. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Constitutional Amendments, Cont
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.