Clinton Vows End to Nuclear Tests Stance on Weapons Freeze Concerns Gop

By Ap | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), August 12, 1995 | Go to article overview

Clinton Vows End to Nuclear Tests Stance on Weapons Freeze Concerns Gop


Ap, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


Fifty years after the bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, President Bill Clinton committed the United States Friday to the drive for a worldwide ban on all nuclear tests. He called it "the right step as we continue pulling back from the nuclear precipice."

The president also said he hoped his decision to forgo even small-scale underground tests - despite the concerns of some advisers - would make it easier to persuade other nations to agree to a worldwide test ban being negotiated in Geneva.

"It moves us one step closer to the day when no nuclear weapons are detonated anywhere on the face of the Earth," Clinton said.

His announcement provoked immediate concern from some Republicans.

The chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee, Sen. Strom Thurmond, R-S.C., said, "I remain to be convinced that we can monitor the reliability, safety and accuracy of our nuclear weapons without the ability to test them.

"These weapons are machines and will break down despite the intense scrutiny they undergo," Thurmond said.

And Sen. John Warner, R-Va., also a member of the Armed Services Committee, said it was unfair to members of the armed forces "to hold out the fact that we have an arsenal without making sure that we know it could work."

Similar worries had been raised by some of Clinton's senior advisers, who felt some tests were essential to keep the nuclear stockpile up to date.

The president tried to ease such concerns by promising to exercise "supreme national interest rights" to withdraw from the treaty and conduct tests if the United States loses confidence in the safety of a critical nuclear weapon. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Clinton Vows End to Nuclear Tests Stance on Weapons Freeze Concerns Gop
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.