Teamwork in Labor Relations

By Harshman, Carl | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), November 2, 1995 | Go to article overview

Teamwork in Labor Relations


Harshman, Carl, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


The trouble with labor unions in our country is systemic, not just a problem with or for the unions. When it comes to the state of the labor movement or almost any other aspect of American business, major forces are contributing to the problem - federal government, state governments, employers and unions.

The soundest long-term solution w will come through collaboration in planning and managing the necessary changes. To prepare for that massive cultural shift to cooperation, each party needs to focus on the mutual, long-term goal of stability and competitiveness for our country's work force. We need better laws to support the future of the American worker and workplace.

Both labor and management need to seek and elevate leadership not only capable of this collaborative thinking - but also driven by its empowering potential.

Labor unions are in turmoil over internal leadership. Some union members want to backpedal to the past with tough, adversarial, powerful men and women at the helm. Those members believe they can win back the losses of the last decade with the traditional approach.

Meanwhile, a powerful alternative is being considered. The leaders of this movement want to work in collaboration with employers to involve and thus strengthen union work forces. This movement represents a shift away from coercive power toward power based on expertise and relationships.

The new, more collaborative union leaders can see the big picture of American work and are mindful of the powerful global economy. They understand the forces of economics, finance, markets and personnel. They also acknowledge that often their labor unions have been remiss in minding their businesses in terms of clear mission, fiscal practices, communication and member service.

Historically, unions devoted massive resources to 5 percent of the members who were constantly in trouble and ignored 95 percent who kept businesses running. That sturdy 95 percent became victims of a punitive, high-control "over-management" system and of their unions, which catered to the squeaky wheels.

The future of unions and of their employers is in the 95 percent. Unions can build bridges to full employment and a good standard of living by taking responsibility for their future. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Teamwork in Labor Relations
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.