CIA Used Psychics to Find Information but They Didn't Help Much, Say Researchers

By Ap | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), November 30, 1995 | Go to article overview

CIA Used Psychics to Find Information but They Didn't Help Much, Say Researchers


Ap, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


For 20 years, the United States secretly has used psychics in attempts to hunt down Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi, find plutonium in North Korea and help drug enforcement agencies, for example.

The ESP spying operations - code named "Stargate" - were found to be unreliable, but three psychics continued to work out of Fort Meade, Md., at least into this past July, said researchers who evaluated the program for the CIA.

The program cost the government $20 million, said Professor Ray Hyman of the University of Oregon in Eugene, who helped prepare the study. The psychics were used by various agencies for remote viewing - to help provide information from distant sites, he said.

Up to six psychics at any one time worked on assignments that included trying to hunt down Gadhafi before the 1986 U.S. bombing of Libya, find plutonium in North Korea last year and locate kidnapped Brig. Gen. James Dozier in Italy.

Gadhafi was not hurt in the bombing. Dozier, kidnapped by the Red Brigades in Italy in 1981, was freed by Italian police after 42 days, apparently without help from the psychics. News reports at the time said Italian police were assisted by U.S. State Department and Pentagon specialists using sophisticated electronic surveillance equipment. 15 Percent Accuracy

The study reported mixed success with the psychics. Hyman was skeptical, while his co-author, Professor Jessica Utts of the University of California at Davis, said some of the results were promising.

Hyman said, "My conclusion was that there's no evidence these people have done anything helpful for the government. …

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