Keep Troops Home, Many in Area Say U.S. Should Solve Own Problems First, Some Declare in Interviews

By Patricia Rice and Marianna Riley Of the Post-Dispatch | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), December 4, 1995 | Go to article overview

Keep Troops Home, Many in Area Say U.S. Should Solve Own Problems First, Some Declare in Interviews


Patricia Rice and Marianna Riley Of the Post-Dispatch, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


At Holy Cross Lutheran Church in Creve Coeur, the Rev. Roy C. Moore prayed that the U.S. peacekeepers going to Bosnia would be "honored and respected."

"As I said those words, many shook their heads affirmatively," the pastor said. At Holy Cross, many people are unclear, even puzzled, about Americans joining NATO peacekeepers.

"People are worried that we might get ourselves into a quagmire - another horrific thing like Vietnam," Moore said.

Sunday morning, as scores of area congregations prayed for the U.S. soldiers asked to keep the peace, President Bill Clinton ordered 700 soldiers to Bosnia.

Most of the sentiment expressed in interviews Sunday was against sending troops to Bosnia.

Outside the Washington Tabernacle Missionary Baptist Church, 3200 Washington Avenue, two men informally debated the issue and summed up feelings of many.

"It's somebody else's war," said Galvin Byrd, who served in the Army in the 1980s in this country. Americans have problems at home, he said.

James J. Williams, a church deacon, who served in the Marines Corps in the 1970s for three years and in reserves for six years, disagreed.

"There are people dying there," he said. "What if it was our grandparents, our sisters and brothers dying here . . . blowing up factories and schools. If we couldn't take care of it ourselves, wouldn't we want another country to help us? If the U.S. doesn't help them, a lot more people are going to die."

He compared the mass killings in Bosnia to the Holocaust under Hitler.

Byrd didn't buy it. The conflict in Bosnia has been going on for generations, he said.

"It is hard to tell who is wrong and who is right this time," Byrd said about the players in Bosnia.

Williams said the United States has the troops and equipment "that I pay taxes for" and should help.

Byrd was not convinced. He fears that Americans might die or get unusual diseases while working in the peacekeeping effort. The `Don't Go' Camp

Perachit Whitaker, 48, of O'Fallon, Ill., is from Thailand and worked on a military base there during the Vietnam War. "I don't think they should go get killed for another country, when our own problems are here," she said. She said she feared the same thing could happen in Bosnia as happened in Vietnam.

She was one of many shoppers at the Fairview Heights shopping center in the "don't go" camp.

Said Jack Hamilton, 57, of Aviston, Ill., "They should stay home where they belong." Hamilton, who runs a feed mill, doesn't believe that the effort will remain a peacekeeping mission for long.

"They have to go, but it stinks," said John Nicholson, 59, of Washington Park. "We've got the same thing here as they have in Bosnia. . . . There's so much hatred over here," he said.

Garic Watson, 29, of Belleville, said he agreed that the United States has an obligation to keep as much peace as possible in the world. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Keep Troops Home, Many in Area Say U.S. Should Solve Own Problems First, Some Declare in Interviews
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.