Change of Faith: Family Reactions

By Buren, Abigail Van | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), January 1, 1996 | Go to article overview

Change of Faith: Family Reactions


Buren, Abigail Van, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


Dear Abby: The Long Island woman who was devastated because her Jewish daughter indicated she may become Catholic should take comfort that Catholics are free to do whatever Jesus did.

Jesus of Nazareth was a Jew who regularly went to synagogue and often led the services. He strictly observed the commandments and celebrated all the Jewish holidays. Any Catholic may go to temple, join the Hanukkah festivities, host or attend a Seder, etc.

In so doing, the Catholic is not "being Jewish." Catholics have not traditionally celebrated the Jewish holidays because for centuries Jews and Catholics saw one another as adversaries.

Today, Jews and Catholics realize that they share the heritage of the Hebrew Scriptures and that they can best resist the rapid disappearance of all religion from public life by working in harmony. It is Catholic to celebrate the miracle of the temple lamp, and much more so to celebrate the time when Jews were saved by the body and blood of a lamb, a foreshadow of the Lamb whose body and blood redeemed us all.

When this woman's granddaughter asks her mother, "Why are we going to Grandma's for Passover if we're not Jewish?" the answer should be: "God calls us to honor our father and our mother; they celebrate Passover and we honor them by being with them on important occasions. Also, because we are celebrating the Passover as Jesus did each year of his incarnate life. Finally, because Jesus instituted the sacrament of Holy Communion at his last Passover Seder."

MARTY BARRACK,

BURKE, VA.

Thank you for an excellent letter. I was touched by the number of readers who reached out to help "Devastated in Long Island" come to terms with her daughter's decision. Read on:

*****

Dear Abby: This letter is in response to the Jewish mother who was devastated by the prospect of her daughter's conversion to Christianity, and therefore her granddaughter's religious upbringing. I'm a Christian and would love to be able to say I'm Jewish - but I can't. …

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