Ira Spurns Peace, Revives Terrorism

By Edwin Yoder Washington Post Writers Group | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), February 15, 1996 | Go to article overview

Ira Spurns Peace, Revives Terrorism


Edwin Yoder Washington Post Writers Group, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


The London Docklands bombing demonstrates once again that "Irish Republican Army" is just a fancy label for a terrorist outfit indistinguishable from any other. A huge bomb in London's East End, for which the IRA claims responsibility, injured more than 100, killed at least two, and did $100 million worth of damage. And this ended an 17-month truce.

There may be an impulse, here and there, to take perverse satisfaction in this sad turn of events, since the U.S. instigators of the flimsy "peace process" that preceded the bombing had been warned that it couldn't last.

Far better to take the incident as an invitation to disabuse ourselves of the giddy illusions gingered up by the Clinton administration's deeply resented intervention in the Northern Ireland question, which the British government properly regards as an internal matter.

The Clinton White House, influenced by Sen. Ted Kennedy's Senate staff, overrode vehement objections from John Major's government when it granted the IRA's political front man, Gerry Adams, a U.S. visa and later received him at the White House. Superficially encouraging noises followed. The IRA proclaimed a "cease-fire." The Major government offered to negotiate with Sinn Fein (the political arm of the IRA) if the IRA would turn in its arsenal. The IRA of course refused. It reserves the right to "negotiate" with a pistol in its pocket. Then the Major government tried another tack. Let the negotiating parties be freely elected, it proposed. The IRA again refused.

You have to be politically dimwitted not to get the point. Sinn Fein and Adams may or may not have influence with the IRA's men of violence. That is obviously very much in question. What is no longer in question is that the IRA, like other terrorist outfits, cannot afford to abjure violence or trade its weapons for elections.

The IRA is, at most, a minority of a minority of a minority in Northern Ireland. It has few friends in the Republic of Ireland, in whose interest it claims to operate, and none at all in the Irish government. Its bottom-line aim is to sever Northern Ireland by force from the United Kingdom, whether or not a majority agree. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Ira Spurns Peace, Revives Terrorism
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.