Before They Were Stars: After Their Arrests Two New Books Showcase Mug Shots for Posterity

By Dennis Romero 1996, Los Angeles Times | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), April 17, 1996 | Go to article overview

Before They Were Stars: After Their Arrests Two New Books Showcase Mug Shots for Posterity


Dennis Romero 1996, Los Angeles Times, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


DOES Danny Bonaduce, formerly of "The Partridge Family," really want the world to remember him as a man who was convicted of beating a transvestite in 1991? Wouldn't Woody Harrelson rather forget his conviction related to drunken conduct 14 years ago? Will Mickey Rourke live down his bad-boy image after his arrest for wife-beating (charges that were dropped)?

Two new books are showcasing cell-bound celebrities and preserving their mug shots for posterity. Even though many of the photos are from their pre-fame days, it's surprising just how many stars have been behind bars. Besides the heavy-rotation hits - O.J. in a daze, Hugh Grant's guilt-ridden gaze, Paul "Pee-wee Herman" Reubens' disheveled haze - there are also rare classics: Al Pacino, Larry King, Suzanne Somers and Jane Fonda - all under arrest. Some in Hollywood doth protest.

Yet Michael Cader speaks proudly of his pictures, available this month in "Famous Mugs: Arresting Photos and Felonious Facts for Hundreds of Stars Behind Bars" (Andrews and McMeel). "I love the Jane Fonda one because she's camping it up so much," says Cader, who compiled the photos for his Andrews and McMeel imprint, Cader Books. "James Brown's (assault, 1988; convicted) is funny because it's clear he gets his photo taken like this so much. It doesn't faze him. Christian Slater (weapons related, 1994; convicted) looks bemused." George Seminara's "Mug Shots: Celebrities Under Arrest" (St. Martin's), also out this month, features more and rarer photos. "My Larry King picture (grand larceny, 1971; charges dismissed) is pretty astounding, especially since he looks pretty arrested," says Seminara, a music video director. "That guy looks busted. Dennis Hopper (traffic related, 1975; convicted) was quite a find. "The whole idea was to take away that beautiful sheen of celebrity. They look like people. I think it's an equalizer." Hollywood is not amused. "I thought it was a low state of affairs before these books came out," says Pat Kingsley, who heads a public relations firm, PMK Inc. …

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