Nobel Laureate Charged with Sexual Abuse of Boy Scientist Brought Children to U.S

By 1996, The Washington Post | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), April 6, 1996 | Go to article overview

Nobel Laureate Charged with Sexual Abuse of Boy Scientist Brought Children to U.S


1996, The Washington Post, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


A Nobel laureate who works at the National Institutes of Health was arrested Thursday on charges that he sexually abused a teen-age Pacific island boy he brought home to live with him in Maryland.

Daniel Carleton Gajdusek, 72, was booked into the Frederick County Jail on two counts of child abuse and two counts of perverted sexual practices and was held on $1 million bail.

The FBI said it began an investigation last year that focused "on his relationship with minor children" whom he brought to the United States from Micronesia and New Guinea after he visited those countries to conduct research. The charges are based on allegations by an informer, now 23 and a college student, who lived with Gajdusek when the informer was 14 and is still dependent on him. FBI agent Patricia L. Ferrante said in an affidavit that after the informer began cooperating with the bureau in February, he placed telephone calls to Gajdusek. In conversation, according to Ferrante's affidavit, the informer "asked him if he knew what a pedophile is, and Gajdusek answered, `I am one.' " On his official resume, Gajdusek (pronounced guy-DOO-sek) lists as his "family" 54 New Guinean and Micronesian children. The resume describes them as adopted, but authorities could find no evidence that those were legally recognized adoptions in the United States. Colleagues said Gajdusek is not married. Earlier Thursday, while Gajdusek was on a plane over the ocean, officers searched his home, his National Institutes of Health office and another office at Fort Detrick, Md. Journals, letters and photographs were among items seized, they said. The FBI said four children were living with Gajdusek at the time of his arrest. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Nobel Laureate Charged with Sexual Abuse of Boy Scientist Brought Children to U.S
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.