New Tricks Greyhounds Lavish Love on Alzheimer's Patients

By Marta Churchwell The Joplin Globe | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), May 19, 1996 | Go to article overview

New Tricks Greyhounds Lavish Love on Alzheimer's Patients


Marta Churchwell The Joplin Globe, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


Bo and Coke are self-appointed watchdogs of short-circuiting memories.

With a nuzzle of the hand, a nudge to the leg or simply a quiet presence, they calm the confusion and anxiety of dementia.

They are a pair of laid-back greyhounds that have found homes in the Alzheimer's units of nursing homes.

On any day, Bo can be found meandering the halls of Meadowbrook Manor, Coke the corridors of Meadows Care Center. They visit bedfast residents and walk with those who wander aimlessly. At night, when the disease inexplicably increases agitation, they go from resident to resident, offering a soothing dose of affection.

"It's interesting to see how a dog takes on a protective nature over 40 some-odd people," says Richele Hughes, Alzheimer's unit coordinator for The Meadows.

It wasn't long ago that the protectiveness and affection of these dogs mattered little. Their futures were about as bleak as the Alzheimer's patients with whom they now live.

Coke, a brindle 8-year-old with a graying muzzle, was a retired racer from a dog track in Waterloo, Iowa. Like other retired race dogs, she was destined for euthanasia unless saved by adoption.

Bo, a black and brown freckled 7-year-old, had no racing history. He was simply a pet that had been shuffled from family to family.

"He was too affectionate. That was the bottom line," says Rinda Kerns, a greyhound adoption coordinator who helped find homes for Bo.

This general temperament of greyhounds and the growing popularity of pet therapy were Bo's and Coke's salvation.

Greyhounds have gained a place in nursing home therapy because they are large enough to reach a bedfast resident and to be reached from wheelchairs, say nursing home administrators. They also can be seen easily by those with failing eyesight.

More important is their disposition.

"Greyhounds are very friendly and mild-tempered, and with people who are confused, that's the kind of dog they need," Hughes said.

They can dash loneliness and anxiety in nursing home residents and give residents something to nurture, a reason to get up in the morning, administrators say. Pets also help remove the institutional atmosphere and make nursing homes more homelike, they say.

"It may be long-term care, but it is their home and we try to keep it as close to `home' as you can get it," says Jane Eddington, administrator of Meadowbrook. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

New Tricks Greyhounds Lavish Love on Alzheimer's Patients
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.