Chip Tynan

By Tynan, Chip | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), August 1, 1996 | Go to article overview

Chip Tynan


Tynan, Chip, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


Q: I have this yellow and orange viney weed that doesn't seem to need a root in dirt. If I leave just a piece of a ring that grows around my cosmos stems it will regrow. It makes little white clusters of flowers. I pick it off several times a day it seems. It wanders from one stem to another and winds around and around. What is it? Where did it come from? How can I get rid of it without killing off my flowers?

A: The plant that you describe sounds like dodder (Cuscuta sp.). Dodder is a parasitic plant that sprouts from seed and grows on its roots only as long as it takes to penetrate a host plant. Like a nightmarish Hollywood alien, it then twines around the host with thin, yellow stems, inserting many suction-like l suckers at intervals along the host's stems and lives off the energy accumulated by the host plant, as its own roots atrophy. Side branches develop rapidly as it spreads its tendrils in every direction seeking new victims. In time, whole plantings may look as though they have been covered with a vegetable spaghetti.

Most likely your infestation began as a seedling that sprouted in your yard. It is unlikely that you would have transplanted an infested plant without noticing something amiss.

Dodder is most frequently seen in rural areas along roadsides and in agricultural fields. It is not unheard of in urban and suburban areas, but more than likely, seeds would have to be carried to these areas from afar. Seeds can be dispersed in many ways. They could come to your yard in a load of topsoil, for instance.

They could also be picked up in mud tracked on shoes from a country excursion. Seeds can also move about on the fur of animals. If you live near a rural area, possibly on land that was cultivated in the recent past, there are probably many wild sources nearby. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Chip Tynan
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.