Roll the Dice on Federal Budget Woes

By Seltzer, Joan | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), July 29, 1996 | Go to article overview

Roll the Dice on Federal Budget Woes


Seltzer, Joan, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


Americans are tired of hearing elected leaders in Washington talk about impending financial doom. A viable solution for some of these problems is Casino U.S.A. - a federally run or franchised casino operation.

States that have opted for casino gambling should be obliged to include Casino U.S.A. Revenues obtained would be strictly voluntary, as gamblers exercise free will in choosing this pastime. Tax-free revenue bonds could be offered in gaming states to underwrite the costs of construction.

A 1994 survey commissioned by Promus Cos., the most diverse U.S. casino operator, found that 59 percent of adults see casino gambling as acceptable for themselves and others.

Gambling has grown to a $407 billion industry. Several state and local governments use revenues from legalized gambling to support schools and infrastructure. Churches also participate. Casinos are the biggest money makers. More than 500 casinos cropped up in the United States in the 1990s. In 1994, casinos in 27 states provided 1 million jobs and brought in $40 billion in annual revenues.

More Americans spent time in casinos in 1994 than attended all major league baseball and National Football League games. With casinos patronized by 125 million Americans, gambling in the United States is rapidly becoming the entertainment pastime of choice.

Casino U.S.A. could make winners of us all. The casino take could be earmarked for federal programs currently in jeopardy.

Medicare celebrated its 30th birthday last July. At its inception, it was heralded as historic and fiscally responsible. Today, Medicare is essentially bankrupt. In 1965, when Medicare was enacted, there were almost six workers to every retiree. Today, there are four. By 2030, there will be only two.

An article by John Liu, a health-care policy analyst at the Heritage Foundation, stated that to bring the program into balance for the short term, an additional 1.3 percent payroll tax would need to be added to the current 2.9 percent Medicare payroll tax. To achieve long-term balance, a payroll tax of 3.52 percent would need to be levied on top of today's rate.

A May 20 commentary in Newsweek stated that in 1995, Social Security and Medicare costs reached $513 billion. The portion of the federal budget jointly spent on Social Security and Medicare is at an all-time high of 40 percent. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Upgrade your membership to receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad‑free environment

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Upgrade your membership to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Roll the Dice on Federal Budget Woes
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved in your active project from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Upgrade your membership to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.