U.S. Finds Gulf Friends Now Hard to Come by Some `Desert Storm' Allies Balk at New Operation

By Robin Wright 1996, Los Angeles Times | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), September 18, 1996 | Go to article overview

U.S. Finds Gulf Friends Now Hard to Come by Some `Desert Storm' Allies Balk at New Operation


Robin Wright 1996, Los Angeles Times, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


IN THE CURRENT showdown in Iraq, the United States has spent almost as much energy - and arguably more clout - dealing with its friends as it has with Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein. But just how much Washington has to show for its efforts has become one of the most controversial aspects of the Persian Gulf crisis.

Kuwait finally agreed Monday to let a few thousand U.S. soldiers deploy in the sheikdom. But the four-day delay after the Pentagon announced the deployment was a far cry from the appeals six years ago to dispatch hundreds of thousands of troops and anything else the Americans were prepared to provide to confront Iraq.

Although President Bill Clinton's administration has secured broad support within the United States for its get-tough policy, the embarrassing episode in Kuwait is a microcosm of U.S. problems in dealing with key parties in the former 38-member coalition that fought the 1991 Persian Gulf War. It also reflects fundamental differences between "Operation Desert Storm" and this year's sequel launched with "Operation Desert Strike." For some allies, not enough is at stake this time. For others, the incentives have shifted over the last six years - sometimes in Iraq's favor. "The old coalition doesn't exist anymore," said James A. Placke, a former U.S. diplomat in Iraq now with Cambridge Energy Research Associates. "But it's somewhat misleading to look at it that way. In each adventure with Saddam, the national interests of each state and the circumstances of the crisis have varied, so it's not surprising that you can't marshal the same team each time." The gulf states still view Hussein as a menace. Yet for many of the emirates, the direct dangers are not high enough nor is the proposed U.S. response large enough to make the price of open endorsement of Clinton's efforts worth the risks, analysts said. "Neither Kuwaiti nor Saudi Arabian oil was threatened this time,' said Judith Kipper, co-director of the Middle East program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. ` Get It Over With' After limited U.S. action, Saddam and the problem he represents also are still around. The core issue is unresolved. Meanwhile, the suffering of the Iraqi people grows - a plight now bound to worsen with postponement of a United Nations deal allowing Iraq to sell oil so that it can purchase humanitarian supplies. As frustration deepens over the U.S. inability to rid Iraq of Saddam, Persian Gulf regimes are ready for something decisive. Yet current American tactics just seem to be more of the same, with no end in sight, analysts said. "I'm hearing a lot of people say that U.S. policy is not working, and if we can't get rid of him then we should adopt a different strategy," said Richard Murphy, a former ambassador to Saudi Arabia who is now at the Council on Foreign Relations and in the region. Geoffrey Kemp, a former administration National Security Council staff member under Ronald Reagan, observed that, "In private, the gulf states wish we'd send B-52s for a week and get it over with. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

U.S. Finds Gulf Friends Now Hard to Come by Some `Desert Storm' Allies Balk at New Operation
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.