Cities Get Free Jail Time for Municipal Scofflaws

By Nordeka English Of the St. Charles Post | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), October 24, 1996 | Go to article overview

Cities Get Free Jail Time for Municipal Scofflaws


Nordeka English Of the St. Charles Post, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


Heads up, scofflaws.

Municipal-court judges may be more likely now to toss you in jail if you don't pay your fine.

Municipalities have been paying $50 a day for each ordinance violator they send to the county jail. But County Executive Joe Ortwerth has initiated a policy that allocates to each of the 17 cities, towns and villages in the county one free slot in the county jail for each day of the year. St. Charles Municipal Judge Joseph Briscoe was glad to hear of the change, particularly for people who have the wherewithal to pay fines but don't. "Our little secret is there's not much we can do to them except annoy them, bring them back week after week and ask them why they aren't paying," said Briscoe, adding that now, "we will feel free to put them in jail." Briscoe has incarcerated ordinance violators in the past - four this year for a total of 15 days. But because of the new policy, cost to the city will be less of a consideration. Ortwerth made the change effective Oct. 1. But Briscoe had not heard the news until Tuesday. City police departments in St. Charles County have holding facilities, comfortable or, as Briscoe says, "humane" enough for a stay up to 20 hours. But the facilities lack showers and other amenities for a longer stay. Ortwerth initiated the policy on his own, bowing at last to mayors who had for years insisted that they had a right to house municipal-ordinance offenders in the Criminal Justice Center at 301 North Second Street. The jail was built with a sales tax paid by the whole county. The jail operation is financed by the county's general fund, which is supported by a countywide property tax rate of 3 cents for each $100 of assessed valuation and a sales tax of three-fourths of 1 percent. "The county does not agree that we have responsibility for these individuals," Ortwerth said. "We believe that if a municipality is going to choose to establish its own court system, adopt its own ordinances and impose offenses against what are city ordinances, the taxpayers in that community should be absorbing the financial cost of that additional level of government. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Cities Get Free Jail Time for Municipal Scofflaws
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.