Prosecutor Drops Charges in Assisted-Suicide Case

By Margaret Gillerman Of The Post-Dispatch This Story Contains Material From The . | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), December 25, 1996 | Go to article overview

Prosecutor Drops Charges in Assisted-Suicide Case


Margaret Gillerman Of The Post-Dispatch This Story Contains Material From The ., St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


The Howard family's yearlong ordeal ended this week when a prosecutor in Newton County, Mo., dropped manslaughter charges that had been filed a year ago when 76-year-old Velma Howard committed suicide.

Her husband, Bernard A. Howard, 77, of Belleville, and her son, Bernard J. Howard, were accused of helping her kill herself in a motel room in Joplin, Mo.

On Monday, Newton County Prosecuting Attorney Greg Bridges dropped the charges. In April, he agreed to delay prosecution for a year as other simil ar cases made their way through the courts around the nation. An attorney for the Howard family, Shawn Askinosie of Springfield, Mo., said his clients were "relieved and surprised." He said the Howards were private people. l "These people are not the standard-bearers of the issue of assisted suicide, and they certainly didn't seek this attention," Askinosie said. "They would like to get on with their lives now." The family, father, son and grandchildren are spending Christmas together in Texas. Velma Howard was suffering from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease. It is a terminal degenerative disease of the nerve cells. She died Dec. 9 after drinking a mixture of alcohol and drugs and putting a bag over her head in a Days Inn motel room, a central location for the Howards and their two sons. (The Howards' other son, Steve, of Lenexa, Kan., was never charged.) Velma Howard, a retired kindergarten teacher, had planned her death for the day after she and her husband had celebrated their 50th anniversary. The Howards were believed to be the first people charged with voluntary manslaughter under Missouri's 13-year-old assisted suicide law. In announcing the charges in January, prosecutors said Velma Howard had followed "a recipe for death outlined in a book describing various methods of ending one's life." The Howards called police to inform them and summon them to the room. Her husband and son were accused of mixing the juice, vodka and drugs that killed her, giving her rubber bands which she used to secure a plastic bag over her head and arranging furniture so she could easily reach the juice and objects. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Prosecutor Drops Charges in Assisted-Suicide Case
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.