Women to Women Program Shares Breast Cancer Education

By John G. Carlton Post-Dispatch Medical | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), November 11, 1996 | Go to article overview

Women to Women Program Shares Breast Cancer Education


John G. Carlton Post-Dispatch Medical, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


Essie Nemons wanted a seat right up front.

"It's just like church," she told the other women as she slid primly into place. "You only get out of it what you put in."

The apartment air was thick with the smell of home cooking - of fried chicken wings and fresh tuna salad. Soon, Estella Vaughn would be talking about her cherished family recipe for frozen custard. But first, there was important business to discuss. First, they must talk about dandelions. Breast cancer is like a dandelion, explained Ernestine Yancy, the woman who brought them together on this cold and rainy morning. When it appears, it can be very tiny like a dandelion's fuzzy seeds. And just as those seeds can scatter in the wind to spread weeds throughout your yard, so the cancer can spread until it infects all of your body. "It is important to find it early and treat it early," Yancy said. Sitting around her dinner table, the women nodded their agreement. And so, another low-tech salvo is fired in the war against breast cancer. For now, it's hardly enough to make a dent. Breast cancer is still the most common form of malignancy in American women, with 160,000 new cases and an estimated 40,000 deaths nationwide each year. But this limited pilot program, developed at the Washington University School of Medicine, might make a difference. In an age of medical miracles, it is a throwback. There is no breakthrough treatment involved; no expensive, high-tech machines. Instead, a few trained volunteers like Yancy give seminars to small groups - in senior centers and private homes - stressing the importance of early detection and treatment. Their audience is other women like themselves: older, primarily African-Americans who live in poor, urban neighborhoods. The reason for that, explained program developer Celette Sugg Skinner, is as simple as it is tragic. African-American women are less likely than others to contract breast cancer, but once they do, they are more likely to die from the disease. "Breast cancer is typically found later in African-American women than in white women," said Skinner, an assistant professor of radiology. "That's due at least in part to a lower screening rate." While the death rate from breast cancer is declining among white women, it continues to rise for African-Americans, she said. The half-dozen women gathered in Yancy's apartment know little about death rates. Death, however, is something with which they are all too familiar. "A friend of mine, she had it," Nemons related sadly. "But she waited too long to see the doctor. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Women to Women Program Shares Breast Cancer Education
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.