Dole Pounds Away on Ethics Issues, Even Golf Score Challenger Calls Money-Laundering an Art Form for `This Administration'

By Compiled From News Services | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), October 19, 1996 | Go to article overview

Dole Pounds Away on Ethics Issues, Even Golf Score Challenger Calls Money-Laundering an Art Form for `This Administration'


Compiled From News Services, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


Bob Dole intensified his criticism of President Bill Clinton's ethics on Friday, accusing him of Watergate-style "abuse of power" and scandals "involving the foreign corruption of America."

"Come clean, Mr. President," Dole, the Republican challenger, said in a day of campaign rallies in three states.

Trailing Clinton in every region of the country with only 18 days left before the election, Dole pressed his search for a late-hour political miracle. He stepped up the effort, begun five days ago, to tie Clinton to questionable campaign contributions to Democrats from Asian business interests. "They take money-laundering to an art form in this administration," Dole said at a rally in a park in Albuquerque, N.M. "Here's a president who often talks about a bridge to the future, but more often it seems it's a bridge to wealthy political donors." Dole raised his attack to a new level Friday: He accused Clinton of cheating at golf. Dole and New Mexico's GOP governor, Gary Johnson, both challenged Clinton's claim that he shot an 83 during an 18-hole round this week in Albuquerque. Later, addressing supporters in a school auditorium in Denver, Dole suggested that tainted money may have found its way "into all those negative ads you see in Colorado" and elsewhere. "We will not sell access to the White House," he said at the rally. "It's time to blow the whistle." Firing back, Clinton's campaign noted three separate investigations of allegations of improper donations to Dole's campaign this year. In one case, a businessman in Massachusetts agreed to pay a $6 million fine for illegally reimbursing employees for contributions to Dole. In the others, companies in Pennsylvania and Nevada are being investigated to determine whether officials there also gave employees money and told them to contribute it to Dole. Dole and senior aides have denied any knowledge of improper contributions. "Bob Dole likes to give these speeches, but maybe he ought to be more worried about cleaning up his own campaign," said Joe Lockhart, Clinton's spokesman. …

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