Making Book on Lots of Flirtatious Maneuvers

By Corrigan, Patricia | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), February 1, 1997 | Go to article overview

Making Book on Lots of Flirtatious Maneuvers


Corrigan, Patricia, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


YOO-HOO, cutie! I'm talking to you! Actually, I'm flirting with you. And lest you think this is yet another bewailing about how people can't flirt openly anymore, it's not.

In fact, it's an informal chat about three nifty little books: "101 Ways to Flirt" by Susan Rabin ($9.95), "Secrets of Seduction for Women" by Brenda Venus ($9.95) and - in case those first two make you edgy - "The Little Book of Calm" by Paul Wilson ($7.95). Plume/Penguin recently published all three.

Where were we? Oh yes, flirting. Author Rabin fancies herself a Master Flirt, and she's determined to help you achieve the same rank. In her book, she promises to teach you to deliver a sexy handshake and other flirtatious maneuvers "that can change your outlook, your attitude, and even your life." She discusses irrational fears that may keep you from flirting. She teaches cues to send so that a certain someone will know you are interested and she cautions against which behaviors may send a mixed message. She even categorizes flirting opportunities by season, so if you mess up in the spring, you can try again in the summer. Rabin reveals four flirting props that attract men: A book, a unique car, jackets and T-shirts with team logos and food. In turn, she tells which four props will attract women: A child, interesting neckwear, a friendly pet and cookware. This stuff doesn't work just with Gen-Xers, Rabin says. She swears that a woman who bought Rabin's first book, "How to Attract Anyone, Anytime, Anyplace," reported that her 70-year-old mother tried out some of her new skills at the grocery. The woman easily attracted the interest of an older gentleman, and then skedaddled out of the store, flushed with success but nervous about what to do next. The only places you shouldn't flirt, Rabin says, are during church or religious services, at a unisex hair salon or in court, especially if you are there getting divorced. She does recommend flirting at a nudist resort, and tells you how: "Wear a snappy tie or grandmother's pearls to dinner," she writes. "The right accessories will always set you apart from the under-dressed." If by some chance, Rabin's book doesn't work for you, she also has produced "How to Flirt," an audiocassette; "How to Flirt, Date and Meet Your Mate," a videocassette; and "Nicebreaker Meeting Cards" for the tongue-tied. …

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