Ambassador Faces Toughest Challenge He Faced Outlaws; Now He Encounters Congress, Public

By Jon Sawyer Post-Dispatch Washington Bureau Chief Post-Dispatch Wire Services Contributed Information . | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), February 19, 1997 | Go to article overview

Ambassador Faces Toughest Challenge He Faced Outlaws; Now He Encounters Congress, Public


Jon Sawyer Post-Dispatch Washington Bureau Chief Post-Dispatch Wire Services Contributed Information ., St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


OVER THE past three years, Bill Richardson has negotiated successfully with some of the world's most notorious outlaws, from Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein to Cuban President Fidel Castro and Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic.

But as he takes up his duties this week as the new U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, Richardson has a job that is tougher still - persuading America's allies, the U.S. Congress and the American public that the United Nations can, should and will be reformed.

"Basically I have to make a transition from dealing with our rogue enemies to dealing with our allies," Richardson said. Richardson presented his credentials Tuesday at the United Nations in New York to Secretary-General Kofi Annan. "Let me state that the United States reaffirms its very strong commitment to the Charter of the United Nations, to the goals of the United Nations - international peace and security, human rights, economic and social development," Richardson said. Drawing On Experience As a Democratic congressman from New Mexico, Richardson, 49, carved out a side career as freelance diplomat, negotiating the release of Americans and others held hostage in some of the most remote and hostile regions of the world, from North Korea to Sudan. In doing so, he drew on his own experience - as a Mexican-American who spent his childhood in Mexico City, earned a degree from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University in Medford, Mass., and went on to win election seven times from one of the most culturally diverse congressional districts in the country. Richardson suggested that his background would serve him well as he delivers what he calls "the concurrent message: not just reforming the U.N. but selling the U.N. to a very skeptical American public." President Bill Clinton's administration's new budget includes an "advance" appropriation of $921 million toward the payment of arrears on U.S. dues to the United Nations, payable only in 1999 and only on condition that the United Nations has by then moved to streamline its bureaucracy. Richardson concedes that even this conditional package will be a tough sale with the United Nations' critics in Congress, foremost among them Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Jesse Helms, R-N. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Ambassador Faces Toughest Challenge He Faced Outlaws; Now He Encounters Congress, Public
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.