Saucy Apple 19-Year-Old Fiona Apple May Have Been a Weird Kid, but She Fits Right in on the Pop Charts

By Sculley, Alan | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), March 27, 1997 | Go to article overview

Saucy Apple 19-Year-Old Fiona Apple May Have Been a Weird Kid, but She Fits Right in on the Pop Charts


Sculley, Alan, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


Fiona Apple says she's enjoying her music career these days. This shouldn't stand out as an earth-shattering declaration. After all, Apple is all of 19 years old, and already her debut CD, "Tidal," has gone gold and produced a hit single in "Shadowboxer." That should be enough to make any debut artist smile.

But when Apple talks about her life and her initial expectations for music, it's clear her new-found contentment is a profound turn of events.

"I'm not in this because this is, like, my childhood dream at all," Apple said of her career. "I feel like it sounds like it's bull----, but I really never wanted this. When I first met {producer and manager} Andy {Slater} and he was telling me about going on tour and what we were going to do and everything, I would smile and I would nod and I would say `Oh, that's great.' "And I would go home and I would cry because I never wanted to go on tour. I never wanted to go into the studio. I never wanted to do any of this. But I have to. It's like a sick kind of psychological need that I need to get my stuff out there. These are things I needed to have said and the only way that I can really feel satisfied is to have it be heard, to say it as loud as I can and make sure it's all said." The need to communicate makes sense considering Apple's background. Growing up in Manhattan, she had few friends, had trouble fitting in at school and found it nearly impossible to communicate her thoughts to her parents and teachers. "I was never taken seriously when I said things," Apple added. "I can remember being so frustrated, just constantly to the point of tears, I think of the thing that I said the most in my life for the first 10 years or so was `Just listen to me. Listen.'... I can remember people saying, `You're 12, Fiona,' and just disregarding everything I had to say. "All of my very deep, intense, serious worries and fears and wonders were just kind of disregarded because I was a kid and I was crazy and I was weird." Obviously, Apple didn't feel that she was crazy. But adults in her life, including her parents and teachers, read her emotions differently and reached other conclusions. As a result, Apple was sent to therapists, which, in the end, did nothing except aggravate her feelings of unhappiness. …

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