Rodman-a-Thon Basking in the Glow of Attention but the Bad-Boy Act from Dennis Is Starting to Wear a Bit Thin

By Lorraine Kee Information provided Post-Dispatch wire services. | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), January 25, 1997 | Go to article overview

Rodman-a-Thon Basking in the Glow of Attention but the Bad-Boy Act from Dennis Is Starting to Wear a Bit Thin


Lorraine Kee Information provided Post-Dispatch wire services., St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


Dennis Rodman is like the third-grader whose sole contributions to class are spitballs, obscene noises made with his armpit and the hope that underneath that rainbow 'do is some method to his madness.

Like that kid, Rodman's basking in the attention.

First, we put up with a couple nights of instant replays of his swift kick to the groin of a courtside cameraman. That's followed by a couple nights of replays of his declaration that he had only tapped the cameraman, after the league slapped him with an 11-game suspension without pay, fined him $25,000 and ordered him to undergo counseling. That was followed by this from President Bill Clinton, shortly after he was inaugurated for his second term: "There are an awful lot of young people out there, particularly your boys and young men, who don't have immediate positive male role models who can contradict a lapse by an athlete," Clinton said in a televised interview Thursday. "I'm sure in his heart of hearts he regrets doing that." Rodman apologized as part of his $200,000 settlement with Eugene Amos. But he's really shown no remorse. "Most people in the world would say he's acting," he said of Amos. But it's Rodman's act that is wearing thin. Think about this, the great Julius Erving said: "Other than just bringing attention to yourself, what's good for the game of basketball? Because once you're out of it, you're going to look back and wish you had given something back." Said Bob Costas: "He remains what he long has been, someone who'd have to move up several notches in order to qualify as a fool. His act is so predictable and uninspired that the only thing that remains truly annoying about the Rodman situation is the number of people who persist in the belief that Dennis Rodman somehow stands for something." Got That In A Plus Size? The absurdity in this whole situation is that it should preoccupy so much of our time. Wrote Chicago Tribune sports columnist Bob Verdi: "It must have been a slow day at the White House. One can't imagine any earthly reason why our esteemed leader would dabble in such minutiae, unless Clinton dreads the warm June morning when he must welcome the Bulls to his mansion after their fifth NBA championship, and Rodman sachets into the Rose Garden dressed up as Hillary. …

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