History in Wax Woman Founds Museum to Honor Blacks with a Missouri Connection

By Yvonne Samuel Of The Post-Dispatch | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), January 6, 1997 | Go to article overview

History in Wax Woman Founds Museum to Honor Blacks with a Missouri Connection


Yvonne Samuel Of The Post-Dispatch, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


Five years ago, Lois D. Conley single-handedly set out to reach an extraordinary goal - to establish Missouri's first Black World History Wax Museum.

She has succeeded.

On Feb. 1, Conley is planning a grand opening ceremony at the museum, 2505 St. Louis Avenue. The museum is the first of its kind in the Midwest and only the second in the nation. "The museum was completed on a wing and a prayer," Conley said. The theme is blacks who have a Missouri connection, she said. When the museum opens, visitors will see life-size wax figures wearing period clothing in their historical setting. Recorded narration and printed text will provide visitors with the historical context of the lives of the people represented. Also, visitors will be able to browse through historical documents, artifacts and memorabilia in a resource library. Among African-Americans featured in the museum will be: The Rev. John Berry Meacham. A former slave and pastor of the First African Baptist Church, he built a steamboat on the Mississippi River and used it as a "floating school" for blacks. Missouri law prohibited blacks from being educated in the 1840s and 1850s. George Washington Carver. A botanist, educator and agricultural chemist who emerged from slavery, he lived in Diamond Grove, Mo., the first 12 years of his life. A school and community center in St. Louis are named in his honor. Elizabeth Hobbs Keckley. Born a slave in Virginia, she grew up to become the dressmaker to First Lady Mary Todd Lincoln. For a time, she lived with the Garland family in St. Louis. In the spring of 1860, she left here and traveled to Baltimore. William Wells Brown. A slave who moved from Kentucky to St. Charles County in 1816. He later moved with his master's family to a farm in St. Louis. He was an anti-slavery spokesman and known as America's first black novelist. James Milton Turner. He served as secretary of the Missouri Equal Rights League, the state's first black political activist organization. He supported black suffrage and black access to education. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

History in Wax Woman Founds Museum to Honor Blacks with a Missouri Connection
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.