In Your Dreams: Callers Get Help from Metaphysics School Hot Line

By Karen Testa Of The | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), April 25, 1997 | Go to article overview

In Your Dreams: Callers Get Help from Metaphysics School Hot Line


Karen Testa Of The, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


The dream scenario of a nervous executive walking into a crowded boardroom and suddenly realizing he's naked is not only fodder for television sitcoms.

It's also one of the most common dreams recounted by callers each year to the National Dream Hotline, an annual project of the School of Metaphysics, based in Windyville, Mo. This year's ninth annual hot line opens at 6 p.m. today and runs until midnight Sunday.

During the marathon session, about 100 people will take phone calls at the college's main campus in southwest Missouri and at 14 satellite campuses in seven states, listen to descriptions of dreams and offer interpretations. "We receive thousands of calls every year," said Laurel Clark, vice president of the college, which was incorporated in 1973. "The people who answer are usually teachers who have studied dreams and their meaning and how to interpret them." Dreams are important messages that should be analyzed, not ignored, Clark said. "Dreams are a communication from the inner self to the outer self that tell you about your own state of awareness," she said. The school has studied dreams for 25 years. Although it teaches courses on how people can learn to interpret their own dreams, "we always have people who want to have us interpret dreams for them," Clark said. A typical dream has the dreamer back at school and realizing he has a test to take but hasn't been in class all semester. "It means . . . they have opportunities for learning in their waking life, and they're missing out on them," Clark said. …

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