Sports Tiger of a Different Stripe Golf Phenom Woods Could Set Record in Endorsements, Too

By Compiled From News Services | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), April 17, 1997 | Go to article overview

Sports Tiger of a Different Stripe Golf Phenom Woods Could Set Record in Endorsements, Too


Compiled From News Services, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


Nike Inc. raised some eyebrows in August when it signed Tiger Woods to a $40 million contract, making the rookie golfer one of the world's highest-paid sports endorsers.

What seemed extravagant now looks like a bargain.

Woods, 21, smashed records this past weekend as he became the youngest and first black winner of the Masters Tournament in Augusta, Ga. The historic victory catapults Woods into the top ranks of endorsers, and maybe beyond. How big? Many experts and agents wouldn't even try to guess. "You can just dream up a number and whatever you come up with, it's going to be close to attainable," said Ralph Cindrich, one of the leading sports agents in the National Football League. "No sports figure right now has his marketability." That's good news for Nike and American Brands Inc., the two companies the budding superstar has signed on with as an endorser. Appeal Of A Higher Degree Woods's appeal goes beyond the traditional golfing crowd, analysts said, meaning he'll draw people from all races, genders and ages to what is typically a white, older and wealthy sport. "He will break down the last bastions," said Brian Murphy, managing editor of the Sports Marketing Letter, a Connecticut-based newsletter. "He will be the first man of color to become a completely credible spokesperson for the highest of high-end goods and luxury items." Woods cruised to a 12-stroke victory at Augusta National in the 61st Masters Tournament, shooting a course-record 18-under par 270. It was his fourth win on the U.S. PGA Tour since leaving Stanford University to turn pro. The $480,000 first-place check from the Masters gives Woods $1,757,594 in earnings since he turned pro on Aug. 27. But Woods is in this for more than money. He has one measuring stick - to be the best golfer ever. While Nike doesn't make golfing equipment, Woods's success has spurred demand for the clothes and shoes he wears. That's in contrast to other golf endorsers such as Jack Nicklaus, whose appeal is more about their clubs and golfballs. "There's nothing in Tiger's set of clubs that will cause people to go and buy what he uses," said Michael May of the Sporting Goods M anufacturing Association. There's plenty of growth to tap into. U.S. sales of golf merchandise are expected to rise 40 percent to about $21 billion in 2000 from $15 billion in 1994. People spend more on equipment for golf than any other sport. Clothing sales are expected to reach $1.6 billion to $1.7 billion from $1.2 billion, according to a report by analyst Joseph Teklits of Ladenburg Thalmann. For now, Nike said it plans to focus on clothes and shoes. "If we can bring value and something new to the golf equipment area, we may look at that possibility," said Jim Small, spokesman for Beaverton, Ore.-based Nike, the world's biggest maker of athletic shoes and clothing. Woods's popularity may make it possible for him to attract sales of products in other sports such as running, said Small. Nike plans to offer a Woods line of signature products in about a year, Small said, just as it sells "Air Jordan" goods endorsed by Chicago Bulls superstar Michael Jordan. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Sports Tiger of a Different Stripe Golf Phenom Woods Could Set Record in Endorsements, Too
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.