Study Criticizes Popular Crime Programs Midnight Basketball Ineffective, Researchers Say

By Fox Butterfield 1997, New York Times News Service | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), April 17, 1997 | Go to article overview

Study Criticizes Popular Crime Programs Midnight Basketball Ineffective, Researchers Say


Fox Butterfield 1997, New York Times News Service, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


THE MOST comprehensive study to date of crime prevention shows that some of the most popular programs - including boot camps, midnight basketball, neighborhood watches and drug education classes in schools - have little impact.

In addition, the study questions the effectiveness of the nation's huge prison construction program in the past two decades.

But the study found promising results for some programs, particularly intensified police patrols in high-crime areas, drug treatment in prisons and home visits by nurses, social workers and others for infants in troubled families. The work was ordered by Congress last year and done by a team of University of Maryland criminologists. The study found that it remained difficult to assess federal crime-prevention programs because there is so little rigorous scientific evaluation of them. The research set out to determine the effectiveness of the more than $3 billion the Department of Justice grants each year to help local efforts to m prevent crime. The study focuses heavily on programs to stop juvenile crime. It was presented to Congress last week and was the subject of hearings this week by the House Judiciary Committee. The study is more a summary of existing evaluations of the various crime prevention programs than an analysis of why each one works or fails. It reported that according to new research, boot camps, midnight basketball, neighborhood watches and drug education classes in schools tended to be short-term programs that did not fundamentally change the behavior of troubled youths or improve the conditions in which they live. But infant visitation programs can have lasting effects because problems are dealt with early, the study reported. Similarly, recent research has found that the police can have an impact on crime if they focus their efforts on high-crime areas or work to stop petty crimes, such as vandalism, as a way to head off felonies. `We Really Can't Tell' The lead author of the report is Lawrence W. Sherman, chairman of the department of criminology and criminal justice at the University of Maryland. Sherman said, "The most important finding is that we really can't tell how a majority of funding is affecting crime." That's because, Sherman said, Congress has never insisted on scientific evaluation of crime prevention programs. The reason for this laxity is that members of Congress tend to vote for anti-crime measures, such as prison construction, if they believe the programs are politically popular or if the programs fit the congressman's own views on crime, said a Justice Department official. In addition, the official said, while it is clear from research that violent crime is heavily concentrated in a few areas of large cities, most members of Congress vote to spread the money to fight crime so more districts are included, instead of concentrating the resources where they would have the most impact. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Study Criticizes Popular Crime Programs Midnight Basketball Ineffective, Researchers Say
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.