Poet out of Rhythm with Today's Game

By Wheatley, Tom | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), April 2, 1997 | Go to article overview

Poet out of Rhythm with Today's Game


Wheatley, Tom, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


Heading into the turn of a new century, spring brings a new baseball worry for this lifelong fan. The question is not how the Cardinals will do this year. It's how the game will do.

This has previously been a fuzzy concern, like the gut feeling you get from a poem that's not understandable word for word.

Strikes, lockouts, bad attitudes, a car dealer in charge, interleague play with nine- or 10-man lineups. A pit in the stomach says baseball is in trouble. It took a poem, or more precisely a poet, to clarify this sense of dread. Jim Smith, who teaches at Mullanphy Elementary School in his native South St. Louis, is another lifelong fan. He wrote a long tribute to Jackie Robinson, which begins: "A Golden Anniversary we celebrate today "Jackie Roosevelt Robinson was the Man who led the way "African by descent, African from the start "Who could quarrel that this lad had a stout heart "The integration of Major League Baseball was at hand "A positive change would sweep through the land "April 15, 1947, was the date "Citizens knew the country could not wait" We'll leave the literary criticism to the pros. The point is that Smith loves baseball enough to compose this poem and talk a prose merchant into reading it over coffee at 7 a.m. on a mutual day off. That enthusiasm is bad for bleary-eyed scribes but good for baseball. What's less good is that Smith is not smitten with today's game. He is 43. Although his third graders presented the poem in Black History Week, and a young black man later saw it and said, "Thank you for teaching me about my heritage," the poem appeals strongly to his fellow white Baby Boomers. As Smith put it, "When I run it by people, especially if they're baseball fans and they're older, they all want a copy." Even when told the price is $25 for an oversized, laminated version. Smith himself prefers the game in the past tense. He talks lovingly about the World Series as it used to be, played in daylight to the unseen mystery of kids like himself. "We were in school and couldn't watch it," he said, "but we all had transistor radios. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Poet out of Rhythm with Today's Game
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.