Two Aids Vaccines Tested Together

By Schieszer, John | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), May 13, 1997 | Go to article overview

Two Aids Vaccines Tested Together


Schieszer, John, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


Here are some recent medical and health care developments in the St. Louis area:

Researchers at St. Louis University School of Medicine have combined two different AIDS vaccines to see if a combination approach can stop the virus dead in its tracks.

The goal, researchers said Monday, is to produce a vaccine for the general public that would prevent infection. The test vaccine will be given to 420 volunteers in St. Louis and 14 other cities. They will receive four immunizations over six months and will be tested for HIV infection at three-month intervals. The study will include individuals ages 18 to 60 with a lower risk for acquiring HIV infection as well as those with a higher risk of infection due to drug use or unprotected vaginal or anal sex. "We don't expect any of these volunteers will go out and get infected. This is to confirm that it is safe and it stimulates antibodies and white blood cell immunity," said Dr. Robert Belshe, director of the Center for Vaccine Development at St. Louis University. If the trial is successful, a study will begin within the next 18-24 months involving up to 10,000 volunteers across the country. Participants in the study will first receive a "primer" vaccine, made from a canarypox virus. The canarypox virus is used as a carrier for specific HIV genes. Until now, the canarypox virus has only been used in experimental vaccines for measles and for rabies. The booster vaccine is a genetically engineered copy of an HIV surface protein. Belshe said neither vaccine can cause a person to become infected with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. "We are in a new era in the development of an AIDS vaccine," said Belshe, who believes a vaccine could be available within the next five years. If this one-two punch vaccine approach works, Belshe said it could pave the way for different AIDS vaccines to be developed in countries around the world. A vaccine that works in the United States may not work in Africa or Asia, he said. "We will have to make country-specific vaccines because there are different strains of the virus," said Belshe. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Two Aids Vaccines Tested Together
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.