Defending Her Virtue May Cost Her 20 Years

By Landers, Ann | St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO), September 22, 1997 | Go to article overview

Defending Her Virtue May Cost Her 20 Years


Landers, Ann, St Louis Post-Dispatch (MO)


Dear Ann Landers: Here is a news story from the Erie, Pa., Daily Times. My husband thought the jury's verdict was right. I did not agree. We got into a big argument about it. What's your opinion, Ann?

M.M. IN SAYRE, PA.

I would not presume to second-guess a jury that has heard all the evidence, so I'm printing the story and will let my readers decide for themselves. Here is the news story: "A simple `no' was usually enough to fend off guys who flirted with the topless dancer. Not so for the drunk who pinned her against an alley wall one night. She ended up kneeing him in the groin and shattering his jaw. Now she faces prison. "Jurors decided last week that the slightly built woman could have walked away once she had the man down on the sidewalk. Instead, she continued to kick him in the head. The dancer could be sentenced to 10 to 20 years in prison following her aggravated assault conviction. The jury of eight men and four women needed only 20 minutes to find her guilty. "The man, 27, married and the father of two, had bruises and cuts all over his face and needed surgery on his jaw. `He may have deserved a slap in the face,' said one juror, `but he certainly did not deserve to have his face stomped on a dozen times."' And now, dear readers, here are a few more details on the story from the Medford, Ore., Mail Tribune: According to the dancer, she continued to kick the man because even when down, he grabbed the waist of her shorts in an apparent attempt to pull her to the ground. A witness testified that he had to pull the dancer off her attacker because she kicked him even after he had stopped resisting. …

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