THE GOOD DOG: Hypoallergenic Dogs: Fact and Fiction

By Beinlich, Jim | The Gazette (Colorado Springs, CO), July 2, 2012 | Go to article overview

THE GOOD DOG: Hypoallergenic Dogs: Fact and Fiction


Beinlich, Jim, The Gazette (Colorado Springs, CO)


First, let me share the name of the vet that I was referred to in my last column. We received numerous requests for his contact information, and I got his permission to use him name. He is Dr. Jim Friedly, and his number is 494-1156. He is very friendly, and told me that he knew I was a skeptic. And, rather than try to defend his techniques, he simply explained what he was doing, and why he was doing it. Like any true expert, he then let the results speak for themselves. Again, my mind was blown!

I am not advising anyone to change vets, and this is in no way discounting the abilities or practices of any other vet, nor modern medicine. We saw Dr. Friedly because of many referrals from friends and clients, and his office is just a few minutes from our house, so it was also convenient. My goal was to enlighten people, as I was, to the efficacy of alternative medicine. So talk to your vet about different options should a health issue arise with your pet.

On to today's topic: Hypoallergenic dogs. Like many people, I accepted the explanations given regarding certain breeds being hypoallergenic, primarily due to minimal shedding, and thus less dander in the area. Then, a few days ago, my wife heard a comment on Animal Planet's "Dogs 101" program, stating that there are no truly hypoallergenic breeds. We were quite surprised to hear that initially, but started thinking about it, and did a little online research. What we found disproved yet another "common knowledge" myth concerning dogs.

The allergens that affect people are certain proteins found in dog dander and saliva. …

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