New Clay Center Art Exhibits Showcase Iconic Musicians, Abstract Photography

By Robinson, Amy | The Charleston Gazette (Charleston, WV), July 12, 2012 | Go to article overview

New Clay Center Art Exhibits Showcase Iconic Musicians, Abstract Photography


Robinson, Amy, The Charleston Gazette (Charleston, WV)


WANT TO GO? Clay Center photo exhibits WHEN: Saturday through Sept. 16 WHERE: Clay Center art gallery COST: Adults, $7.50, children $6 INFO: 304-561-3750 or www.theclaycenter.org. A free opening reception runs 6 to 8 p.m. Saturday.

On Saturday, the Clay Center will open two traveling photography exhibits: "Artist to Icon: Early Photographs of Elvis, Dylan and the Beatles" and "The Edge of Vision: Abstraction in Contemporary Photography."

"For ['Artist to Icon'], the images are of the early days for each of the artists - young Elvis, young Beatles, young Dylan," said Arif Khan, the Mary Price Ratrie Curator of Art. "The Beatles were still wearing suits and had moptops, stuff like that. It documents their rise to fame."

"['The Edge of Vision'] is a group exhibit featuring several artists who explore abstraction in art through photography," he explained. "It's an interesting way of looking at it. They do light studies - how light reacts with photographic paper - and color studies, exposing how certain colors blend together to create abstract patterns."

"Artist to Icon," organized by Seattle's Experience Music Project, features nearly 50 black-and-white photos that show the musicians before their fame shot into the stratosphere. The works come from photographers like Alfred Wertheimer, Daniel Kramer, Astrid Kirchherr and Max Scheler.

Wertheimer photographed Elvis in 1956 as RCA was promoting the 21- year-old singer's appearance on Tommy and Jimmy Dorsey's "Stage Show." Kramer worked with Bob Dylan in 1964-65, shooting photos that made their way onto five Dylan album covers, including "Bringing It All Back Home" and "Highway 61 Revisited." Kirchherr and Scheler took behind-the-scenes pictures of The Beatles during the filming of "A Hard Day's Night."

"The Edge of Vision" comes from New York's Aperture Foundation, which was founded in 1952 by Ansel Adams, Dorothea Lange and others. The exhibit has 20 single images and seven installations, many being exhibited for the first time, as well as two videos and one audio component. …

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