Blame Barclays, Not Capitalism

By Goldberg, Jonah | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, July 14, 2012 | Go to article overview

Blame Barclays, Not Capitalism


Goldberg, Jonah, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


Why aren't more people furious about the Libor scandal?

That's a question mostly being asked on the political left these days. And they're right to ask it.

Here are the basics:

Barclays is the second-largest bank in Britain and one of the largest in the world. It has admitted to U.S. and British regulators that it manipulated the London interbank offered rate, or Libor, which basically measures how much it costs banks to borrow money from one another for various periods of time.

If you ever read the fine print on a home mortgage, credit card agreement or car loan, you've seen reference to Libor.

Indeed, a conservative estimate is that $350 trillion in bonds and loans is pegged to Libor worldwide. That's more than 20 times the GDP of the United States.

In email exchanges between Barclays' New York traders and the bank officials who are supposed to submit honest data to the entity that calculates Libor, it's clear that the bank routinely rigged the data to maximize profits.

It was so routine that nobody even bothered to hide the corruption in euphemism. One official responded to a request from a trader to fix the number, "Always happy to help, leave it with me, Sir." Another replied, "Done ... for you big boy ..."

Barclays agreed to pay $450 million in fines to avoid prosecution. Several officials at the bank, including American-born CEO Robert Diamond, have resigned.

The left's response, predictably, is to pound the table about corruption, the need for more regulation and the inherent sinfulness of capitalism.

They're entirely right about the first part, possibly right about the second and deeply confused about the third.

The corruption really is outrageous and I wish my fellow conservatives could muster a bit more public disgust. There's really no point in simultaneously talking about "leaving things to the market" and celebrating the rule of law if you're going to respond to this kind of game-rigging with a yawn.

Moreover, as a political matter, staying on the sidelines almost guarantees that the problem will be made worse. The relentless push for more regulation and more oversight boards, commissions and agencies hasn't done anything to curb such scandals. But making the relationship between government and business more interwoven and complex has entrenched the "too big to fail" mindset. What's required aren't new regulations so much as relentless enforcement of the existing laws, without fear or favor. …

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