Pittsburgh Public Schools Furloughs 271 Employees

By Zlatos, Bill | Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, July 26, 2012 | Go to article overview

Pittsburgh Public Schools Furloughs 271 Employees


Zlatos, Bill, Tribune-Review/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review


As a single mom, Kim Flurry thought she was doing the right thing.

She gave up the security of her job as a teacher's aide with the Pittsburgh Public Schools to get a bachelor's degree in education from what is now Carlow University. She waited until four years ago to teach at Pittsburgh Faison so that she could raise her daughter, Daile.

Now she is one of 190 teachers and 81 other district employees whom the city school board voted, 6-0, on Wednesday night to furlough. Directors Regina Holley, Sharene Shealey and Mark Brentley Sr. were absent.

"I have the American dream," said Flurry, in her 50s, of Highland Park. "I worked hard. I'm a role model for my daughter. I've got 21 years invested in the Board of Education, and now I'm going to have no job."

In the spring, district officials estimated that 450 teachers could lose their jobs, but retirements, resignations and medical leaves reduced the number. The district has 2,245 full-time, professional employees represented by a teachers' union, said district spokeswoman Ebony Pugh. Of those, 1,890 are classroom teachers.

"The numbers are down, but it sure beats where it was, and we will keep monitoring the situation until all of our members are back where they belong in front of students moving them forward," said Nina Esposito-Visgitis, president of the Pittsburgh Federation of Teachers. …

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