Managers, Coaches Perform Similar Duties

By Rollins, Mheegan | New Haven Register (New Haven, CT), July 29, 2012 | Go to article overview

Managers, Coaches Perform Similar Duties


Rollins, Mheegan, New Haven Register (New Haven, CT)


The 2012 Olympics have begun.

The opening ceremony was exciting, colorful and creative. Most of us have a favorite Summer Olympic Games opening ceremony that captivated our imaginations and whetted our appetites for the athletic competition to follow.

You may have noticed, as the national teams were entering the opening venue, a number of people who did not appear to have the same youthful bounce to their step as the atheltes.

Those Olympians who do not compete, but who contribute in many was to the final medal tally are coaches.

Most of us have a favorite sport or two highlighted during the Olympics. Each of our favorite sports has a coach. For some large national teams, such as the United States, there are multiple coaches for teams including soccer, basketball, swimming, track and field, etc.

Occasionally, some nations are represented by a single athlete, who will be accompanied by a coach or two.

There are many parallels between the work of managers in your organizations and the work performed by coaches in the Olympics.

At nearly every Olympic event, you can notice people in the background supporting the athletes. The coaches may be providing inspiration after a less than perfect gymnastics routine. Or you may see the coach providing information on the timing of an event.

In the team sports, coaches are patrolling their usual territory of designing strategy, calling timeouts or making substitutions. The coaching points can be observed at nearly every Olympic event.

For each athlete there have been years of preparation and training. …

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