Ukrainian City Spurns Communism REVOLT IN THE SOVIET UNION

By Nick Worrall, | The Christian Science Monitor, May 21, 1990 | Go to article overview

Ukrainian City Spurns Communism REVOLT IN THE SOVIET UNION


Nick Worrall,, The Christian Science Monitor


IF President Mikhail Gorbachev loses sleep over the thought that Lithuania wants to leave the Soviet Union, the idea that Ukraine could do likewise must give him nightmares.

The republic is a powerhouse, a granary, and a pantry operated by 50 million of the Soviet Union's most economically active people.

Although secession is not imminent, a small revolt in the western Ukraine shows what could develop if enough native Ukrainians join a growing movement for self-determination.

It happened two months ago here in Lvov, an old, typically European city that was once part of Poland. A group representing various organizations, including Rukh, the Ukrainian national movement, swept the Communist Party from power here by capturing 80 percent of the seats on the regional soviet, or council.

This month not a single Soviet red banner flutters above the city's key public buildings. Even the Communist Party headquarters is flying the resurrected Ukrainian blue-and-yellow national flag.

The still-conservative Communist authorities in Kiev, the Ukrainian capital, are not happy. In fact, they threaten economic sanctions and other forms of punishment as Lvov's deputies debate measures to obliterate communism from the region, which was incorporated into the Soviet Union at the end of World War II and is today populated by 5 million people.

The leader of the revolt is Vyacheslav Chornovil, a former journalist who now heads the local soviet. Mr. Chornovil, of Cossack descent, was released recently after 15 years in labor camps and exile to Siberia. He is a fervent Ukrainian nationalist, a crime for which he could have been executed six years ago.

"It's been a real revolution," he says. "We have real people's power here in Lvov."

"Here's a paradox," Chornovil smiles. "The people who were imprisoned for so-called anti-Soviet activities are now the leaders of the soviets (councils). And we are accusing the Communists of anti-Soviet activities."

The council has adopted a resolution to this effect in the midst of a clash over control of the Communist-dominated mass media. The council is demanding that the party hand over control of the local Ukrainian-language newspaper.

The action that has most incensed Kiev is the unilateral legalization of the Uniate (Ukrainian Catholic) Church, which Soviet dictator Joseph Stalin banned in 1946 and which Pope John Paul II has been urging Mr. Gorbachev to reinstate. The majority of western Ukrainians are devout Uniates, and many of their priests have been persecuted over the past 44 years.

Most of the banned Uniate churches were transferred to the Russian Orthodox Church, but even before the new decree, many Ukrainian congregations switched their churches back to houses of Uniate worship.

The Transfiguration Church, standing in the center of Lvov, was the first to do so. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Ukrainian City Spurns Communism REVOLT IN THE SOVIET UNION
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.