Hills Focuses on Trade Reforms Agriculture Talks with Europe Are Key to Talks Aimed at Liberalizing Worldwide Agreements. GATT NEGOTIATIONS

By Ron Scherer, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, May 21, 1990 | Go to article overview

Hills Focuses on Trade Reforms Agriculture Talks with Europe Are Key to Talks Aimed at Liberalizing Worldwide Agreements. GATT NEGOTIATIONS


Ron Scherer, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


CARLA HILLS, the United States trade representative, has become a woman with a mission: to convince Congress, the nation, and the world of the need for global trade reform.

Now that the trade waters with Japan have temporarily been smoothed, Mrs. Hills is focusing on the last six months of the four-year negotiations to liberalize the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade (GATT). That treaty that covers a significant portion of world trade. It is a rare Hills speech that does not mention the trade talks now taking place in Geneva.

In an interview, Hills describes the GATT negotiations as "complicated but vital to not only America's future but the rest of the trading world."

"Ambassador Hills is the out-front spokesman," says Sam Gilston, editor of the Washington Tariff & Trade Letter, a newsletter.

For Hills, sometimes called the "Sphinx of Trade" because of her lawyerly coolness, there are political risks and rewards. "If she is successful, she can turn out to be like Joan of Arc and if she fails she could also turn out to be like Joan of Arc," says Mr. Gilston.

Hills will certainly have her hands full trying to make the talks succeed. The negotiations are difficult and complicated. The 97 nations that make up the GATT must all agree by consensus on the issues. There are 15 separate negotiating groups tackling different trade areas. Included in the current round of talks - known as the Uruguay round - are proposals to reform agricultural policies and to bring textiles under the multinational system. The negotiations are expected to intensify this fall as the December deadline nears.

The most difficult sector to date has been the agricultural negotiations. Clayton Yeutter, former US trade representative and now agriculture secretary, was in Geneva two weeks ago. According to an Agriculture Department official, there are some "encouraging signs" of progress. The Europeans have agreed to negotiate in the four areas proposed by the US: export subsidies, market access, internal price mechanisms, and sanitary standards.

Hills calls agriculture "the key to the round." But she will not comment on whether failure in agriculture will destroy the process. "I am projecting that rational minds can see precisely what I see, that the year has come to bring down these protections," she says. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Hills Focuses on Trade Reforms Agriculture Talks with Europe Are Key to Talks Aimed at Liberalizing Worldwide Agreements. GATT NEGOTIATIONS
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.