Mexico, US, and Trade

The Christian Science Monitor, June 22, 1990 | Go to article overview

Mexico, US, and Trade


MEXICO'S president needs to move fast to consolidate his economic reforms. That's why Carlos Salinas de Gortari recently switched his position on a free-trade agreement with the United States and hustled off to Washington to discuss the matter. That's also why Mr. Salinas earlier this week flew to Tokyo, with hopes of attracting further Japanese investment.

As Salinas darts among world capitals, the Mexican economy totters back home - responding, though slowly, to the president's free-market therapy. Its problems include dwindling foreign reserves because of capital flight and a growing trade imbalance; a political culture that makes further privatization of state-run industry extremely difficult; a $95 billion foreign debt that's only being slightly whittled down by debt-reduction schemes; a populace gripped by unemployment and inclined toward leftist political appeals.

It's not surprising that US and Japanese officials and investors remain cautious.

After years of urging Mexico to consider free trade, Washington was taken aback when a Mexican president suddenly took up the offer and suggested that a deal be completed in less than the three years needed to finish the US-Canada trade pact.

The negatives quickly came into focus. US unions, joined by industries wary of "unfair" competition, clamored about the dangers of US jobs flowing toward Mexico's low wages and inexpensively produced goods flowing northward. Such concerns are well founded. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Mexico, US, and Trade
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.