Job Satisfaction

The Christian Science Monitor, June 28, 1990 | Go to article overview

Job Satisfaction


WOULDN'T you agree that the second most important thing to having a job is being happy in your job? In fact, job satisfaction is so beneficial to the employee and the employer that more and more companies are making special efforts to help employees feel good about their work.

What makes us happy on the job? Good surroundings, nice people to work with, a good salary, interesting work?

Each of us could probably make a long list of what we think an ideal job should be like, but often people who are really happy at their jobs are not necessarily working in ideal conditions. Their happiness seems more related to how they approach their work than to the conditions of the work itself.

If it is inner qualities rather than external circumstances that give a person job satisfaction, then anyone has the opportunity to improve his working environment. The values you and I bring to our jobs -- rather than the size of the office we are in, the mood of the people around us, or even the tasks we do -- make the difference between our satisfaction or dissatisfaction. For example, a spirit of cooperation or a willingness to learn can contribute a lot to job satisfaction. Any quality that is related to love -- helpfulness, generosity, dedication, tolerance, friendship -- makes a job more satisfying.

Why is this? The life of Christ Jesus would suggest it is because our real job is to express spiritual good in all that we do. Jesus talked about his own work in terms like this: "My meat is to do the will of him that sent me"1 and "I am among you as he that serveth."2 Jesus' purpose and satisfaction came from obeying his creator, God, divine Love.

We each have a relationship to God that gives our activities significance, and, in that respect, our goal for our own work is similar to what Jesus said of his mission. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Job Satisfaction
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.