Mexican Painters New and Old Washington Mansion Becomes Home for Mexican Cultural Institute. ART

By Louise Sweeney, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, July 1, 1990 | Go to article overview

Mexican Painters New and Old Washington Mansion Becomes Home for Mexican Cultural Institute. ART


Louise Sweeney, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


THE former Mexican Embassy here, a mansion that once had a sitting room with 14-carat gold walls, now houses treasures of a cultural kind.

The red, white, and green flag of Mexico flies over the new Mexican Cultural Institute, high above Meridian Hill here. The institute, formally opened by the Mexican President Carlos Salinas de Gortari, marks its premiere with a triple art exhibition.

"Masters of Mexican Art" includes 50 paintings by such celebrated 20th-century painters as Diego Rivera, his wife Frida Kahlo, Rufino Tamayo, and Jose Clemente Orozco. A second exhibition, "Five Contemporary Mexican Artists," includes works by Jose Fors, Roberto Marquez, Agustin Portillo, Remigio Valdes de Hoyos, and Luis Vatsoto. A third show focuses on an exhibition of photography by Lourdes Almeida.

Among the most memorable paintings are Rivera's "The Girl Lupita Cruz," which shows a tawny, wide-eyed child whose tiny hand is holding an orange chair with a rush seat. She wears a long pink dress, orange ribbons in her black hair, and a quizzical expression. Rivera's tantalizing "Study of Tina Modotti" begins at the bridge of her nose, omits the eyes, but shows us the strong mouth, black curls, and brawny hands of his model. Kahlo's "Sun and Life" centers on a round, orange, smiling sun with human features and one blue eye staring out from its forehead, while around it fleshy green leaves and a tiny gray embryo spout tears.

The most ecstatic and vibrantly lovely painting in the collection may be Tamayo's "Watermelons," in which curves of lush rose-pink color rimmed with green split open and become abstract ideas against an orange and red background. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Mexican Painters New and Old Washington Mansion Becomes Home for Mexican Cultural Institute. ART
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.