Japan Looks to Its Workers to Sustain Economic Growth New Government Blueprint Aims to Reduce Alienation

By Clayton Jones, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, July 19, 1990 | Go to article overview

Japan Looks to Its Workers to Sustain Economic Growth New Government Blueprint Aims to Reduce Alienation


Clayton Jones, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


FOR a peek at what the future may hold for Japan, one need go no farther than Yokohama, just outside Tokyo.

There the world's first indoor surfing center is being built. When finished, it will make waves for an emerging breed of leisure-seeking Japanese.

But the oddest aspect of this tsunami-like thrill lies in the fact that the backer is a leading Japanese steelmaker, Nippon Kokan Corporation.

Redirecting Japanese industry to become more "human-oriented" has become the oracle's cry for the Japan of the 1990s. And, as in past decades, the oracle itself is the Ministry of International Trade and Industry, or MITI.

"It is now important that Japan create an environment that will enable individuals to lead a leisurely life," states MITI's blueprint for the decade.

Past MITI blueprints, or "visions," have set the pace every 10 years for postwar Japanese export industries to take a share of selected world markets. Each economic strategy helped the government "guide" companies to invest heavily in such areas as steel, cars, or computer chips.

This decade, the target is "creating human values in the global age."

Does this mean Japan has gone soft?

Not exactly. Keeping Japan's giant manufacturers healthy still has top priority. And the MITI report warns that Japan must not follow other industrialized nations which are losing vitality in "making things" while favoring such high-wage, service businesses as finance and banking.

Rather, MITI's bureaucrats are worried by two disturbing trends: increasing alienation of Japanese workers and isolation of Japan from other nations. Both could adversely effect industry in the future, and the MITI vision aims to head off trouble.

"We have to recognize clearly that Japanese society in the past used to be a corporation-oriented society," Kunio Morikiyo, director of MITI's policy planning.

MITI's analysis finds the Japanese people holding "increasing doubts" that their living standards have risen along with corporate wealth. Without change soon, "a feeling of frustration may permeate society," MITI report states.

To boost the quality of life, the agency gently nudges other ministries to take such steps as lowering prices on consumer items and housing, and reducing working hours (which are 10 percent higher than those of other industrial nations). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Japan Looks to Its Workers to Sustain Economic Growth New Government Blueprint Aims to Reduce Alienation
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.