The Third World of California

By Richard J. Cattani. Richard J. Cattani is editor of the Monitor. | The Christian Science Monitor, August 16, 1990 | Go to article overview

The Third World of California


Richard J. Cattani. Richard J. Cattani is editor of the Monitor., The Christian Science Monitor


`CALIFORNIA used to be a bellwether for the rest of the country," says Mervin Field, dean of the state's pollsters. But if it says less about America's future, it still says much about the country's present.

California is America's leading third-world state, where demographics has overtaken politics.

California whites represent some 58 or 59 percent of the population; on election day, however, whites account for 85 percent of the vote. Of the nonwhite sector, three fourths are Hispanic and Asian. Efforts to enroll minority voters are stymied by language, illegal status, and registration laws. Some 200,000 more new students appear at the school doors each year; bilingual instruction in Los Angeles County schools runs to over 80 languages.

Many newcomers hang back within enclaves, seeking work but not learning English. And yet night schools for English as a second language run literally around the clock.

Economic forces are driving a wedge between the classes. Million-dollar homes are under construction along the canals of Venice, by the ocean. So-called affordable housing development is diverted inland to the desert scrim.

Los Angeles is losing dominance as urban sprawl creeps toward the Mexican baja, where demographers picture the American Pacific coast's largest city arising early in the next century.

With a love-hate restlessness, the Mexican-American population shifts northward and back south again.

Jerry Brown, the former governor who now heads the state Democratic Party organization, takes no great note of the Hispanic and Asian tide. He says of immigrants: "They've been coming since the Gold Rush."

He and Field agree that the state's political structures are losing relevance before the state's human and economic dynamics. "The parties are quasi-public utilities," Brown observes. "The source of money to register people to vote gets smaller, but the number of people to register gets larger." The legislature is captured by special interests, he says. Ballot initiatives, bafflingly worded, intimidate voters. …

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