A Peace Conference That Might Work Tie Resolution of the Palestinian Problem to Regional Disarmament

By Steven Kull. Steven Kull is a visiting scholar Center research associate . | The Christian Science Monitor, January 9, 1991 | Go to article overview

A Peace Conference That Might Work Tie Resolution of the Palestinian Problem to Regional Disarmament


Steven Kull. Steven Kull is a visiting scholar Center research associate ., The Christian Science Monitor


TALK about a Mideast peace conference is growing. While some hope that such a conference will offer a raison d'sortie for Saddam Hussein, thus averting war, the US fears that it will be interpreted as a concession to Saddam and thus a reward for aggression. There is a way, however, that the US can establish the agenda for such a peace conference so as to make it a coup rather than a concession.

The US could insist that the agenda not only include the Palestinian issue, but also the prospect of a regional disarmament regime - including weapons of mass destruction. The implicit rationale would be the disproportionate military forces arrayed against Israel. The US could even make it a condition for the conference that all participants, especially Iraq, indicate their willingness to pursue such a regime.

If this condition would be accepted, it would be a boon for American interests as well as for regional security. If arms reductions are achieved, Iraq, due to its disproportionately large military, would be required to make some of the greatest reductions. This would help reduce the possibility that Iraq could continue to threaten the region after withdrawing from Kuwait.

Even if this seems like a fatuous hope, pursuing such a conference would be worthwhile. If there is a general acceptance of the linkage between regional disarmament and the Palestinian issue, Saddam will be put in a position to either cooperate in disarmament or risk being held up as the obstacle to resolving the Palestinian issue.

Saddam could not even count on avoiding such an embarrassment by Israeli resistance to such an idea. Israel has recently expressed interest in regional disarmament, even indicating a willingness to put its nuclear weapons on the table. This is not surprising given that its forces are relatively so small that any disarmament regime would call for much greater force reductions to Israel's enemies; Israel's strength has always been in its military skills. With reductions in the military threat to Israel, it may indeed be willing to accept greater sovereignty for the Palestinians. In the short run, Israel may at least be more ready to join a Mideast peace conference in which their intransigence would not be the only agenda item. …

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