War Question Hangs Darkly over Presidential Race Most Potential Democratic Candidates Oppose War Option

By John Dillin, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, January 15, 1991 | Go to article overview

War Question Hangs Darkly over Presidential Race Most Potential Democratic Candidates Oppose War Option


John Dillin, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


THE Persian Gulf debate could now spill into the 1992 presidential race, especially if war with Iraq causes heavy American casualties.

Most Democrats on Capitol Hill strenuously fought efforts to give President Bush the power to go to war. Republicans generally supported the war option.

Leading the Democratic resistance were Sen. Sam Nunn of Georgia and House majority leader Richard Gephardt of Missouri, both prominently mentioned as potential White House candidates in '92.

Although Mr. Bush narrowly won the struggle in Congress, the bulk of Democratic leadership on Capitol Hill was lined up against him, including several people besides Senator Nunn and Mr. Gephardt who might like his job - Sen. Bill Bradley of New Jersey, Sen. Paul Simon of Illinois, Sen. Lloyd Bentsen of Texas, Rep. Patricia Schroeder of Colorado, Sen. Joseph Biden Jr. of Delaware, and Sen. Bob Kerrey of Nebraska.

Outside Capitol Hill, other leading Democrats also took shots at Bush's move toward war, especially his insistence that he could make war without congressional approval.

The Rev. Jesse Jackson warned earlier that "if Mr. Bush unilaterally disregards the role of Congress in this deliberative process, he must face the challenge of impeachment."

And in New York state, Gov. Mario Cuomo, another possible '92 Democratic presidential candidate, scoffed at Bush's previous claims that he could go to war without authority from Congress.

However, two other Democrats with possible designs on the White House, Sen. Charles Robb of Virginia and Sen. Albert Gore Jr. of Tennessee, supported the president.

Depending on the outcome in the Gulf, the die seems cast for sharp clashes in next year's campaigns - first, in the Democratic primaries, then in the general election.

The forthrightness of Democratic opposition to a Gulf war indicates that the party is stiffening its resolve after years of suffering from its "soft on defense" image at the polls. McGovern hurt Democrats on war

Ever since 1972, when George McGovern led Democrats to one of their worst defeats with his opposition to the Vietnam War, the party has taken a beating among voters on defense issues.

But Nunn, a strong advocate of defense, provided Democrats with both intellectual firepower and ideological cover to resist the president's rush toward the war option after Jan. 15.

"President Bush, Congress, and the American people are united that (Saddam Hussein) must leave Kuwait," Nunn told his colleagues. "We differ on whether these goals can best be accomplished by administering pain slowly with an economic blockade, or by dishing it out in large does with military power. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

War Question Hangs Darkly over Presidential Race Most Potential Democratic Candidates Oppose War Option
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.