THE WORLD FROM... Pretoria No Longer a Pariah, South Africa Is Renewing Diplomatic Ties with Many Nations, Including African States

By Battersby, John | The Christian Science Monitor, May 21, 1991 | Go to article overview

THE WORLD FROM... Pretoria No Longer a Pariah, South Africa Is Renewing Diplomatic Ties with Many Nations, Including African States


Battersby, John, The Christian Science Monitor


THE leaves are beginning to fall rapidly in this tree-lined capital city as winter approaches, but at the bustling Department of Foreign Affairs in the imposing Union Buildings, spring is only just beginning.

"There is a definite opening up and a new acceptance of South Africa internationally," says Coen Bezuidenhout, a foreign ministry official who recently returned from four years at the South African mission in Washington.

In a dramatic reversal of South Africa's pariah status for the past four decades, Foreign Affairs Minister Roelof (Pik) Botha told Parliament last week that South Africa would establish diplomatic relations with 15 new countries by the end of this year. Planning of the new missions, mainly in Africa and Eastern Europe, is already far advanced and some - like Hungary - have already opened.

The new outward thrust, made possible by the political changes initiated by President Frederik de Klerk, is largely trade driven, but it holds many political and diplomatic rewards.

Missions in the process of being established include the Soviet Union, Poland, Czechoslovakia, Romania, Bulgaria; Ivory Coast and Togo in West Africa; and Morocco, Madagascar, and the thriving Indian Ocean island-state of Mauritius.

"The opening of these new missions is proof that the whole situation is normalizing under De Klerk," says Mr. Bezuidenhout, who has recently been appointed media officer of a hastily created VIP section of the foreign ministry to handle an anticipated spate of foreign visitors in the next six months.

The biggest breakthrough for Pretoria is the establishment of diplomatic ties with Moscow. Other African states that could soon agree to exchange diplomats include Zambia, Angola, Nigeria, Kenya, and Egypt. Pretoria already has trade missions in Zimbabwe and Mozambique, diplomatic relations with Malawi, Swaziland, and Lesotho, and representative status in Namibia and Botswana. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

THE WORLD FROM... Pretoria No Longer a Pariah, South Africa Is Renewing Diplomatic Ties with Many Nations, Including African States
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.