Bush's Nominee to Replace Justice Marshall Shocks Rights Movement

By Marshall Ingwerson, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, July 3, 1991 | Go to article overview

Bush's Nominee to Replace Justice Marshall Shocks Rights Movement


Marshall Ingwerson, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


CLARENCE THOMAS makes a provocative possible successor to United States Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall.

Even before President Bush named him, Judge Thomas appeared to be whom Justice Marshall had in mind when he worried about the president replacing him with "the wrong Negro."

For those concerned that, with Marshall's departure, the court is losing its only present member with firsthand knowledge of racial oppression and life among the poor, Thomas would seem to fill the bill.

"I would think there would be a tremendous impulse (for him) to identify with the poor," notes Abraham Goldstein, who taught Thomas criminal procedure at Yale Law School.

Yet Thomas is also a conservative who believes that the modern civil rights movement began going off the track even in its founding victories - such as the Brown v. Board of Education decision in 1954 that mandated desegregating public schools.

Departing Justice Marshall was the legal mastermind of the modern civil rights movement and personally argued the Brown case before the Supreme Court.

The confirmation battle in the Senate will begin in September. The signs are already out that Thomas will not have an easy time. Sen. Paul Simon (D) of Illinois, a member of the Judiciary Committee, which holds hearings and initially recommends whether or not to confirm judicial appointments, immediately declared that Thomas's views, not his background, matter most and charged him with "going out of his way" to weaken civil rights protections as chairman of the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.

An immediate concern of many senators is to ascertain Thomas's views on abortion, an issue likely to come before the Supreme Court in a very direct form during its next term.

Unlike David Souter, the little-known and still little-understood Supreme Court justice from New Hampshire, Clarence Thomas has been a prolific writer throughout the 1980s. Most of his published views concern discrimination and civil rights. He shares the view that dominated the Reagan administration: that the law should be colorblind.

Thomas is strongly opposed to racial segregation, but in a 1987 law review article he explained how he believed the civil rights revolution went slightly wrong. He says that in the Brown v. Board of Education decision, Chief Justice Earl Warren made the right decision - to desegregate public schools - for the wrong reason. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Bush's Nominee to Replace Justice Marshall Shocks Rights Movement
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.