US Foresees Foreign Policy Impact of Mexican Trade Pact

By David Clark Scott, writer of The Christian Science Monitor | The Christian Science Monitor, August 1, 1991 | Go to article overview

US Foresees Foreign Policy Impact of Mexican Trade Pact


David Clark Scott, writer of The Christian Science Monitor, The Christian Science Monitor


NORTH American free-trade pact or not, Mexico is continuing a long tradition of charting its own course in foreign affairs.

The United States joined the European Community last month in lifting economic sanctions against South Africa. Mexico did not. And Nelson Mandela, the spare, globe-trotting leader of the African National Congress, was in Mexico yesterday and is in Brazil today during a Caribbean and Latin American tour shoring up support for continued sanctions.

"We ask you ... to apply all pressure against the white regime," Mr. Mandela told a large gathering of diplomats, intellectuals, and local politicians at the Mexican Foreign Ministry Monday.

South Africa would like to buy Mexican oil and sell mining equipment here. But Mexico remains one of the few nations still maintaining a complete diplomatic and trading ban. Until the black majority gets the right to vote, sanctions will remain, Mexican officials say.

South Africa is not the only example of sometimes stark US-Mexican foreign policy differences.

Central America has been an area of contention throughout the 1980s. Mexico, for example, condemned the 1989 US invasion of Panama and still refuses to recognize President Guillermo Endara's right to rule.

The Sandinista guerrillas had the full backing of Mexico when they overthrew dictator Anastasio Somoza Debayle in 1979. The Farabundo Marti National Liberation Front (FMLN) rebels in El Salvador have offices in Mexico.

The US and Mexico butted heads over Cuba as recently as June, when Mexico sought the island nation's readmission to the Organization of American States, from which it was excluded in 1962.

"We can create a favorable political climate in Cuba by stimulating trade and tourism and inviting the Cuban government to take part in international meetings," argued Mexican Foreign Minister Fernando Solana. The US opposed the move.

But there is speculation that a North American free-trade pact may usher in an era of less conflictive US-Mexico policies. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

US Foresees Foreign Policy Impact of Mexican Trade Pact
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.