Public Confidence, Waste Disposal Top List of Nuclear Power Concerns

By Jim Bencivenga, | The Christian Science Monitor, October 7, 1991 | Go to article overview

Public Confidence, Waste Disposal Top List of Nuclear Power Concerns


Jim Bencivenga,, The Christian Science Monitor


THROUGH a series of legislative, regulatory, and commercial decisions, the United States is establishing the course of the next 40 years for its nuclear power industry, say energy experts.

Nuclear power remains an emotional subject for many people. Restoring battered public confidence is essential, say boosters and critics of the industry.

That is why the shutdowns of the Yankee Rowe and Maine Yankee reactors last week were significant steps forward in restoring that confidence, these experts say.

The US still has a long way to go in developing an overall energy policy, says David Rossin, former assistant secretary of energy for nuclear energy in the Reagan administration and president-elect of the American Nuclear Society. Nuclear power must be seen as only one of the elements of a national energy strategy, he says.

Merely providing better information does not mean more nuclear plants should be or will be built, or that older plants will be relicensed, says Robert Pollard, a nuclear safety engineer and a former Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) safety official.

Nuclear power generates 20 percent of the nation's electricity; in nine states, the industry provides one-third of the electricity used.

Of the 110 reactors now in operation, 66 will need their operating licenses renewed by the NRC in the early part of the next century.

Given the long lead-time in the licensing process - at least 10 years - and the fact that no new nuclear plant has been ordered since 1974, industry sources say the US must squeeze a longer life out of the existing plants.

A commercially viable and publicly perceived safe way to build and operate new plants is also needed, they say.

How many old plants will actually apply for license extensions? The NRC's best estimate is 70 percent.

There are two separate safety issues in the relicensing process, says Mr. Pollard, who also represents the Union of Concerned Scientists on nuclear issues.

Are the plants as safe now as when they were first built? Should the plants that apply for license renewal have to meet new, and tougher requirements established since their original license was granted? …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Public Confidence, Waste Disposal Top List of Nuclear Power Concerns
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.